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Garage Doors – Series 2

It has been a couple of weeks since I last posted any images on my blog, so I thought that I would take a moment to reflect on my previous “Door” posts. My first post on doors was in January 2017, when I displayed images of some doors from travels in England and Ireland. Over the ensuing eight months, I posted another 12 sets of door images – making doors my most common theme over the year.

I have received more views and likes of my door images than for any other theme. No doubt, this success was due to my participation in Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors group. Thank you Norm for all of your work, and thank you to all the other door lovers out there.

My earlier door posts featured images from other parts of the world. Having depleted much of my foreign collection of doors, my posts have become more localized, focused closer to home in Toronto. The subject matter has become more mundane, but I am still trying to find something unique in an otherwise ordinary scene.

When I posted my first series of doors from the UK and Ireland, I had not anticipated that they would become part of a series. The same can be said for my more recent post on Garage Doors. But here I am, posting some more garage doors – all located within walking distance from my home.

Here is this week’s contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors weekly feature.

I am more attracted by the brick rather than the doors in brick garage. The colour and the texture of the bricks, and the fragility of the structure are most notable. The driveway ramp no longer slopes up to the doors, so one wonders what is stored behind these doors now?

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brick garage

In semi-symmetry, the near-perfect symmetry of the two halves of this semi-detached residence drew my attention. The wrought iron handrails and balconies are identical, while the colour of the garage doors provides some individuality to each side. My guess – the purple door is not original.

I always used to refer to these types of residences as duplexes. However, I have since learned that, in a semi-detached home, the two residences are side-by-side and share one common wall. In a duplex, the two residences are one atop the other. They both have separate exterior entrances.

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semi-symmetry

I will admit that the thing that attracted me initially was the green door in infill. It was only later that I recognized that there is an infill panel where a garage door used to be. The garage door has been replaced with a man-door and HVAC equipment – and there is more space for storing the ubiquitous blue wheelies.

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infill
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Multiple Doors

I am fond of creating a theme within a theme in my posted images. When I discovered Norm’s Thursday Doors (or, to be more precise, after Norm found my blog), I tried to think of different ways to group my door images so that the doors could be categorized in some way for each blog post.

This week, I have chosen “multiple” as my theme for doors. Coincidentally, all images include multiples of three. All of these doors were found in Toronto.

Multiple doors are usually associated with the exiting requirements for large and high-occupancy buildings. My first two images – Massey Hall and the Horse Palace – are good examples of this.

Massey Hall was described in one of my previous blog posts as it was one of my Open Doors Toronto destinations in May 2017. The bright red doors are very distinctive, and will hopefully survive the pending upgrade to this concert venue.

The Horse Palace has an art deco facade, and these “people’s” entry doors complement the art deco design. The Horse Palace is located at Exhibition Place, and was opened in 1931 as one of several facilities that accommodate the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) and the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. It includes stables and a riding ring, and it is used by the Toronto Police Services mounted unit and a public riding academy. The entry doors were restored in the 1990’s.

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Massey Hall entrance
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The Horse Palace people’s entrance

Toronto Fire Station 423 also has a trio of doors. It took a couple of visits for me to be able to photograph the station when all three doors were closed.

A closer examination of this image reveals some interesting aspects of the fire hall. Note the four fire hydrants that are located in front of the pillars that separate the doors. I don’t know if the hydrants are functional or not. The fire hall also underwent a name change some time in the past. The remnants of the previous name “Fire Hall No. xx” can be seen under the current name. The fire hall likely got renumbered after the amalgamation of six municipalities in 1998 to create metro Toronto. The numbering of fire halls is not something that one would usually consider – until a need emerges to renumber them all. I also like the sign on the far left – “Make Your Intention … Fire Prevention.” We are often asked to consider our intentions – this is a worthwhile one.

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Toronto Fire Station 423
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Utility Doors

Functionality is the theme this week for my Thursday Doors contribution. You can label it brutalism, you can call it minimalism – these doors serve a specific function. There is very little unknown about what lies behind these doors.

Most of these doors are contemporary and have very little aesthetic value. However, it is interesting to look at the high voltage access door, where the designers still felt it was important to surround the door with an art deco frame. This is a more attractive door, which may be interesting to the passing public, even though entry remains strictly controlled.

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fire protection access
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emergency exit 00Q
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high voltage access
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utility door 32286

 

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Garage Doors – Series 1

I have discovered that Toronto is a great source for taking photos of garage doors. Here are a few local doors as my contribution this week to Norm’s Thursday Doors blog.

Most of these garage doors are provided for use by automobiles, which continue to dominate our urban landscape. My favourite image in this set is titled a drive down memory lane. The painting of an circa 1960 American convertible rolling down a country lane brings back memories of a more innocent past when cars were king, and the size of a pocket cruiser!

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loading bay
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underground parking
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blue garage door
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a drive down memory lane
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Bicycle Collection – Part 2

For many cyclists who have owned a bicycle for a long time, it is difficult to give up on the old, trusty machine when it has truly passed its functional life cycle. How can you recycle a bicycle?

Some tips are provided on the internet. One pessimistic suggestion is to just leave the bicycle unlocked on the street, and it will soon disappear and become someone else’s solution – or problem. Some bikes can be dismantled, and the components reused on another bike, or crafted into some unique decoration.

The following images illustrate other approaches to repurposing old bicycles. Some have been strung up on a wall and used as signposts. Others have been sprayed with neon paint to attract the attention of a passer-by – it is intersting to note that these bicycles have still been secured to their final resting place with a lock and chain, regardless of their lack of functionality.

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ET went home
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a place to retire
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rail bike?
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diamonds in the rough
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Bicycle Collection – Part 1

It has been a few weeks since I last posted on my blog. I thought that I would start a new “thread” of posts based on one of my favourite topics – bicycles.

Cycling was one of my favourite recreational pastimes throughout much of my life. Cycling to school, cycling to work, bicycle touring on the weekend and bicycle touring on vacation. It all came to an abrupt end, after being hit by a car door, but that’s another story.

During my travels, I have always looked out for bicycle photo ops. The following images are the beginnings of my nostalgic look at old bicycles and how they are or have been used. I hope that you find some enjoyment in these as well.

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bicycle and flower pots
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bicycle and treats
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bicycle leaning on a concrete block wall
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Door Oddities

This will be my last regular post of images of doors for a while. I will be away for a few weeks and I am uncertain when I will have the time and opportunity to contribute to Thursday Doors.

In the meantime, I hope that you enjoy this week’s contribution of a “potpourri” of doors that have some unusual characteristics.

When is a door not a door? Maybe when it is missing. The door at this address has been replaced by a sheet of plywood, but hopefully a new door will be installed when the construction is completed.

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Door MIA

This second image was selected more for the resident door stop than the actual door. Maybe trolls shop here.

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Friendly door stop

This next door looks very much like it has a face and a moustache. One has to wonder – was this intentional or just left to the beholder’s imagination?

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Doorway with a face

We all know what happened when King Henry VIII was not amused – off with her head! Best to obey the sign and enter the pub through the correct door. Too bad they didn’t write the sign using an older style of font.

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The wrong door
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Doors of the UK – Part 2

My original post of three doors from the UK (albeit two were actually from Ireland) was not intended to be serialized as a weekly post. But then Norm from Thursday Doors commented on my doors – and so we have progressed on a new track.

In this week’s post I am revisiting my collection and adding three more doors from the UK.  I have also corrected the title of my earlier post and sub-titled it “Part 1.”

The first two images are of grand Georgian doors from the Royal Crescent in Bath. I came across these doors in mid-December one year, just following the first snow fall of the season. In some parts of the world, we are still seeing some snow, so these doors are still “in season.”

Apparently, door No. 22 has received some notoriety, due to its colour. In the 1970’s, the resident of No. 22 painted her door yellow, while all of the other doors were painted white. The Bath City Council insisted it should be repainted white, the Secretary of State for the Environment intervened, and the door remained yellow. Rebellion in Bath!

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No. 22 The Royal Crescent
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No. 23 The Royal Crescent
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Door No. 10, somewhere in Oxford

The third door image was shot in Oxford, and is probably the earliest vintage door in my digital collection. The longer I study this door, the more I discover its eccentricities. One of the stained glass panels differs from the other two as the grid pattern is smaller. And what happened to 10A?

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Doors with a Nautical Theme

My contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors this week is doors with a nautical theme. The door with a porthole is similar to one I included in an earlier post, but it comes from a coastal port in Cornwall, instead of Ireland. Maybe, over time, the porthole got miniaturized to become the peephole that is now a common feature in doors?

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The Seawitch, Penzance, Cornwall
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Mermaid Cottage, Kinsale, Ireland
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Doors of southern France – Part 2

This is the second half of my collection of doors from southern France, and this week’s contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

We begin with another door from Narbonne – this one more institutional than the doors included in Part 1. Someone has gone to a lot of work to preserve the finish on these two wood doors. The two gargoyles are also quite well preserved.

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Office door in Narbonne

The glazed door is from a hotel in Avignon. The glazing and the opened door make this entrance much more inviting than any of the other doors – but then, for a hotel to be successful, this is a good feature to have.

Avignon is well known as the site of the Pont d’Avignon, located on the Rhone River. Several popes resided in Avignon in the 14th Century, and parts of the city are now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, making it a popular tourist attraction.

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Hotel door in Avignon

The third door is from Les Baux-de-Provence, another historic village in southern France. Baux is a hilltop village that has been inhabited for thousands of years. There are typically more tourists than villagers in town on most days.

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Old door in Les Baux-de-Provence

The largest set of doors in my French collection belong to the Church of Saint-Trophime in Arles. The church is well known as a good example of Romanesque architecture – note the round arch above the doors – as are the sculptures on the portal.

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Church of Saint-Trophime, Arles