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Garage Doors – Series 2

It has been a couple of weeks since I last posted any images on my blog, so I thought that I would take a moment to reflect on my previous “Door” posts. My first post on doors was in January 2017, when I displayed images of some doors from travels in England and Ireland. Over the ensuing eight months, I posted another 12 sets of door images – making doors my most common theme over the year.

I have received more views and likes of my door images than for any other theme. No doubt, this success was due to my participation in Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors group. Thank you Norm for all of your work, and thank you to all the other door lovers out there.

My earlier door posts featured images from other parts of the world. Having depleted much of my foreign collection of doors, my posts have become more localized, focused closer to home in Toronto. The subject matter has become more mundane, but I am still trying to find something unique in an otherwise ordinary scene.

When I posted my first series of doors from the UK and Ireland, I had not anticipated that they would become part of a series. The same can be said for my more recent post on Garage Doors. But here I am, posting some more garage doors – all located within walking distance from my home.

Here is this week’s contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors weekly feature.

I am more attracted by the brick rather than the doors in brick garage. The colour and the texture of the bricks, and the fragility of the structure are most notable. The driveway ramp no longer slopes up to the doors, so one wonders what is stored behind these doors now?

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brick garage

In semi-symmetry, the near-perfect symmetry of the two halves of this semi-detached residence drew my attention. The wrought iron handrails and balconies are identical, while the colour of the garage doors provides some individuality to each side. My guess – the purple door is not original.

I always used to refer to these types of residences as duplexes. However, I have since learned that, in a semi-detached home, the two residences are side-by-side and share one common wall. In a duplex, the two residences are one atop the other. They both have separate exterior entrances.

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semi-symmetry

I will admit that the thing that attracted me initially was the green door in infill. It was only later that I recognized that there is an infill panel where a garage door used to be. The garage door has been replaced with a man-door and HVAC equipment – and there is more space for storing the ubiquitous blue wheelies.

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infill
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Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge: Shape

Sometimes a photo challenge topic comes along and you know right away: I have a good example for that.

Here is my submission this week for Paula’s Lost in Translation Black & White Challenge: Shape.

My “shape” is a unique light fixture found in a downtown office building in Toronto. I titled it light spill because it looks like something that spilled on the floor – except this is looking up, not down.

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light spill
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Multiple Doors

I am fond of creating a theme within a theme in my posted images. When I discovered Norm’s Thursday Doors (or, to be more precise, after Norm found my blog), I tried to think of different ways to group my door images so that the doors could be categorized in some way for each blog post.

This week, I have chosen “multiple” as my theme for doors. Coincidentally, all images include multiples of three. All of these doors were found in Toronto.

Multiple doors are usually associated with the exiting requirements for large and high-occupancy buildings. My first two images – Massey Hall and the Horse Palace – are good examples of this.

Massey Hall was described in one of my previous blog posts as it was one of my Open Doors Toronto destinations in May 2017. The bright red doors are very distinctive, and will hopefully survive the pending upgrade to this concert venue.

The Horse Palace has an art deco facade, and these “people’s” entry doors complement the art deco design. The Horse Palace is located at Exhibition Place, and was opened in 1931 as one of several facilities that accommodate the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) and the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. It includes stables and a riding ring, and it is used by the Toronto Police Services mounted unit and a public riding academy. The entry doors were restored in the 1990’s.

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Massey Hall entrance
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The Horse Palace people’s entrance

Toronto Fire Station 423 also has a trio of doors. It took a couple of visits for me to be able to photograph the station when all three doors were closed.

A closer examination of this image reveals some interesting aspects of the fire hall. Note the four fire hydrants that are located in front of the pillars that separate the doors. I don’t know if the hydrants are functional or not. The fire hall also underwent a name change some time in the past. The remnants of the previous name “Fire Hall No. xx” can be seen under the current name. The fire hall likely got renumbered after the amalgamation of six municipalities in 1998 to create metro Toronto. The numbering of fire halls is not something that one would usually consider – until a need emerges to renumber them all. I also like the sign on the far left – “Make Your Intention … Fire Prevention.” We are often asked to consider our intentions – this is a worthwhile one.

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Toronto Fire Station 423
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Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge – Ceiling

Some blogging photo challenges inspire me more than others. This month I found some inspiration in Paula’s Lost in Translation Black & White Challenge: Ceiling.

Two images from London, England, immediately came to my mind as worthy of posting on my blog. Both ceilings are examples of functional architecture, bringing daylight into a central and otherwise enclosed space.

Covent Garden Market was opened in 1830, and was designed to enclose an outdoor market that had been on the site since the late 17th Century. This photograph was taken in December – hence the Christmas decorations hanging under the skylight.

The Tate Modern Gallery is housed in a repurposed power plant on the south bank of the Thames. The Bankside Power Station was rebuilt after WWII as an oil-fired electricity generating plant, and this skylight was originally located over the turbine room, which is now the main entrance hall to the Tate.

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Covent Garden Market
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Tate Modern Gallery
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A Visit to Crawford Lake

I recently visited Crawford Lake, located NW of Toronto, near the City of Milton. Crawford Lake is a conservation area that is managed by Conservation Halton, which is a regional land use administrative authority.

Although Crawford Lake Park is named after a farming family that settled by the lake, the park is known for the reconstructed Indigenous longhouses located on the site. The original inhabitants of this site were Nations of the Iroqoian linguistic group, who occupied a village on the site from around the 13th to the 17th centuries.

Three of the longhouses have been reconstructed and are used as presentation spaces and to display artifacts found during archaeological investigations at the site.

The images presented focus on the wooden structure of the longhouse. They are also being posted in conjunction with this week’s theme of Black & White Sunday: Structure on Paula’s Lost in Translation blog.

The basic structure consists of tree trunks that are buried in the earth, and connected at the top with flexible poles. The cladding consists of bark from trees. I am unsure of the materials used to construct the roof membrane.

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turtle house entrance
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turtle house elevation
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lattice structure
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silhouette
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Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Numbers

Over the centuries, stone masons have been known to chisel their unique, distinguishing mark into a stone, leaving their signature for future generations. Moving forward in time to the past century, concrete has become a prolific construction material.

Here in Toronto, I have discovered that sidewalk installers have been keen to embed their “signatures” in freshly laid concrete. Here are a few examples of modern day concrete markers, indicating the dates when the concrete was installed. These are my submissions in response to Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Numbers for this week.

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For the budding urban archeologist, these sidewalk markers can be used to determine the dates of previous infrastructure upgrades, and identify the businesses that were active in their trade at that time. Anyone interested in doing some sidewalk rubbings?

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1969
CBWC-Numbers Panza 1996 cw
1996
CBWC-Numbers Topit 2001 cw
2001
CBWC-Numbers Il Duca 2002 cw
2002
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2012
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Utility Doors

Functionality is the theme this week for my Thursday Doors contribution. You can label it brutalism, you can call it minimalism – these doors serve a specific function. There is very little unknown about what lies behind these doors.

Most of these doors are contemporary and have very little aesthetic value. However, it is interesting to look at the high voltage access door, where the designers still felt it was important to surround the door with an art deco frame. This is a more attractive door, which may be interesting to the passing public, even though entry remains strictly controlled.

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fire protection access
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emergency exit 00Q
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high voltage access
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utility door 32286

 

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Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Wheels

I selected a couple of images of old wheels to post in response to Cee’s weekly Black and White Photo Challenge for this week. These wheels belong to old carts that were the primary means of transporting commodities in their day. Presently, they are on display for public viewing at museums or antique shops, as a reminder of the past.

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The Cumnock Star wagon was built in the 1870’s and operated on a round trip route between Cumnock and Molong, in central New South Wales, Australia. This wagon was drawn by a team of 9 clydesdales, carrying wheat in one direction, and beer, spirits and supplies in the opposite direction. The Aussies have always needed to be well supplied!

The old cart and wheelbarrows are on display at the Weald and Downland Living Museum, located in southern England, and the subject of one of my previous blog posts.

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The Cumnock Star
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cart and wheelbarrow wheels
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Garage Doors – Series 1

I have discovered that Toronto is a great source for taking photos of garage doors. Here are a few local doors as my contribution this week to Norm’s Thursday Doors blog.

Most of these garage doors are provided for use by automobiles, which continue to dominate our urban landscape. My favourite image in this set is titled a drive down memory lane. The painting of an circa 1960 American convertible rolling down a country lane brings back memories of a more innocent past when cars were king, and the size of a pocket cruiser!

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loading bay
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underground parking
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blue garage door
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a drive down memory lane
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Bicycle Collection – Part 2

For many cyclists who have owned a bicycle for a long time, it is difficult to give up on the old, trusty machine when it has truly passed its functional life cycle. How can you recycle a bicycle?

Some tips are provided on the internet. One pessimistic suggestion is to just leave the bicycle unlocked on the street, and it will soon disappear and become someone else’s solution – or problem. Some bikes can be dismantled, and the components reused on another bike, or crafted into some unique decoration.

The following images illustrate other approaches to repurposing old bicycles. Some have been strung up on a wall and used as signposts. Others have been sprayed with neon paint to attract the attention of a passer-by – it is intersting to note that these bicycles have still been secured to their final resting place with a lock and chain, regardless of their lack of functionality.

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ET went home
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a place to retire
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rail bike?
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diamonds in the rough