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Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Numbers

Over the centuries, stone masons have been known to chisel their unique, distinguishing mark into a stone, leaving their signature for future generations. Moving forward in time to the past century, concrete has become a prolific construction material.

Here in Toronto, I have discovered that sidewalk installers have been keen to embed their “signatures” in freshly laid concrete. Here are a few examples of modern day concrete markers, indicating the dates when the concrete was installed. These are my submissions in response to Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Numbers for this week.

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For the budding urban archeologist, these sidewalk markers can be used to determine the dates of previous infrastructure upgrades, and identify the businesses that were active in their trade at that time. Anyone interested in doing some sidewalk rubbings?

CBWC-Numbers Repac 1969 cw
1969
CBWC-Numbers Panza 1996 cw
1996
CBWC-Numbers Topit 2001 cw
2001
CBWC-Numbers Il Duca 2002 cw
2002
CBWC-Numbers Gazzola 2012 cw
2012
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Utility Doors

Functionality is the theme this week for my Thursday Doors contribution. You can label it brutalism, you can call it minimalism – these doors serve a specific function. There is very little unknown about what lies behind these doors.

Most of these doors are contemporary and have very little aesthetic value. However, it is interesting to look at the high voltage access door, where the designers still felt it was important to surround the door with an art deco frame. This is a more attractive door, which may be interesting to the passing public, even though entry remains strictly controlled.

d12-sprinkler system door cw
fire protection access
d12-emergency exit 00Q cw
emergency exit 00Q
d12-high voltage cw
high voltage access
d12-grey utility door cw
utility door 32286

 

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Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Wheels

I selected a couple of images of old wheels to post in response to Cee’s weekly Black and White Photo Challenge for this week. These wheels belong to old carts that were the primary means of transporting commodities in their day. Presently, they are on display for public viewing at museums or antique shops, as a reminder of the past.

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The Cumnock Star wagon was built in the 1870’s and operated on a round trip route between Cumnock and Molong, in central New South Wales, Australia. This wagon was drawn by a team of 9 clydesdales, carrying wheat in one direction, and beer, spirits and supplies in the opposite direction. The Aussies have always needed to be well supplied!

The old cart and wheelbarrows are on display at the Weald and Downland Living Museum, located in southern England, and the subject of one of my previous blog posts.

CBWC-cumnock star cw
The Cumnock Star
CBWC-Wheels-wagon wheels b_w cw
cart and wheelbarrow wheels
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Garage Doors – Series 1

I have discovered that Toronto is a great source for taking photos of garage doors. Here are a few local doors as my contribution this week to Norm’s Thursday Doors blog.

Most of these garage doors are provided for use by automobiles, which continue to dominate our urban landscape. My favourite image in this set is titled a drive down memory lane. The painting of an circa 1960 American convertible rolling down a country lane brings back memories of a more innocent past when cars were king, and the size of a pocket cruiser!

loading bay cw
loading bay
underground parking cw
underground parking
blue garage door cw
blue garage door
a trip down memory lane cw
a drive down memory lane
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Bicycle Collection – Part 2

For many cyclists who have owned a bicycle for a long time, it is difficult to give up on the old, trusty machine when it has truly passed its functional life cycle. How can you recycle a bicycle?

Some tips are provided on the internet. One pessimistic suggestion is to just leave the bicycle unlocked on the street, and it will soon disappear and become someone else’s solution – or problem. Some bikes can be dismantled, and the components reused on another bike, or crafted into some unique decoration.

The following images illustrate other approaches to repurposing old bicycles. Some have been strung up on a wall and used as signposts. Others have been sprayed with neon paint to attract the attention of a passer-by – it is intersting to note that these bicycles have still been secured to their final resting place with a lock and chain, regardless of their lack of functionality.

bicycle don montolio cw
ET went home
bicycle albergue cw
a place to retire
orange bicycle-railing cw
rail bike?
pink bicycle-brow bar cw
diamonds in the rough